My Clothes Were Making Me Fat

One of the best things about losing weight has been being able to walk into a shop, see something I like and buy it. At my biggest, I could only fit into a few certain shops and so I normally always avoided shopping because I knew it was pointless.

But one thing I have struggled to change is wearing baggy clothes. I never considered myself overly self-conscious even at my biggest – sure I didn’t like the way I looked but I didn’t let it stop me from doing anything. But looking back I suppose I was and still am to an extent because of how baggy my clothes were. I always thought having clothes that clung to my fat was horrible, yet when I think about it I was the same size regardless of whether my clothes clung or not.

I recently went through my wardrobe with the help of my friend and sister and threw out about 90% of my clothes, donating the good quality clothes to charity and binning the clothes that had seen better days. Even then I had very different opinions to my friend and sister about what was too big and what should be thrown away. But I’m slowly learning that wearing baggy clothes can actually make me look bigger than what I am and some clothes should be a tighter fit. When I go shopping I can still struggle to pick the right size and usually get a friend’s opinion to make sure it isn’t too tight or too baggy.

Hopefully I’ll continue to lose weight and learn over time what suits me! I thought I would finish this post with a small comparison of the size I used to be and a photo of myself and sisters at my sister’s graduation. I know the angles are slightly different and my sister’s robe hides me a bit but I am so pleased with the progress I have made so far!

 

Why #LikeAGirl Remains A Brilliant Campaign And Message

Over a year and a half has passed since Always released their #LikeAGirl campaign and it remains one of my favourite marketing campaigns. The advert brilliantly demonstrates how it has become normal for society to associate feminine qualities with weakness by showing different generations portraying what they think it means to do an activity ‘like a girl’.

The campaign aligns itself perfectly with their target market of women, managing to tackle an important social issue whilst subtly promoting their brand. By positioning themselves as compassionate and supportive for girls and women, the viewer is prompted to place trust in the brand and the products they have on offer.

It is interesting to see the young boy’s reaction to the interviewer when asked if he thinks he insulted his sister; ‘No, I mean, yeah… insulted girls, but not my sister’. This adds another thinking point to the campaign making the viewer consider who it is they could be damaging or limiting when making a derogatory slur towards women. A professional in work may make a rude comment towards their female colleagues and think nothing of it however would they react differently if they witnessed their mother, sister, wife or friend belittled or patronised because of their gender? The campaign, whilst promoting Always, manages to guide the viewer to think about the issue in a bigger context.

Always have also taken a step in promoting feminism as an approachable movement. The opening sequence sparks interest in the viewer to see what direction the advert will go in and shows them how a comment that at first may appear harmless, or even normal, can actually be damaging to a woman’s confidence and development.

It is rare that you see a company tackle social issues without an overbearing feeling that they are only doing it for the good publicity it may bring. Always seem to have found the perfect balance through their clever positioning and gentle, relatable approach.